Hawk-moth saldo 2016

In summer 2016 my goal was to spot some caterpillars of Hawk-moth species that I haven’t come across recently. Here’s a wrap-up of all species I managed to find, including the the hummingbird hawk-moth (Macroglossum stellatarum) from which I received caterpillars from a friend.

There’s a lot of challenge left for next year. Nevertheless, it was nice to finally find caterpillars of the Privet Hawk-moth (Sphinx ligustri). Another nice surprise was to spot a caterpillar of the Eyed Hawk-moth (Smerinthus ocellatus). All in all, it has been 7 Hawk-moth species in summer 2016. And bottom line, it’s always a great moment when coming across caterpillars of hawk-moth.

At the playground

Playing at the playground with the kids may bring a surprise every once in a while. I spent a lot of time during late summer finding caterpillars of the Privet Hawk-moth (Spinx ligustri), but the only ones I found were right at the playground. Two playgrounds, to be precise.

After the first caterpillar already had parasites I was lucky enough to spot another one. The second was entirely healthy. It was also younger compared to the adult caterpillar found two weeks earlier. While I was watching after our three kids my wife was kind enough to bring my camera from home, so I managed to get a couple shots from the beautiful Privet Hawk-moth caterpillar right in its habitat.

Half-success with Sphinx ligustri

Since about two weeks I’ve had a special priority: To find caterpillars of the Privet hawk-moth (Sphinx ligustri). It’s the largest caterpillar that can be found in Finland and it almost looks like a gigantic candy.

The search has been exhausting and with my e-bike I’ve been riding several hundred kilometers, keeping a close eye on growth that the caterpillar accepts as food plant. While I was able to locate several other species of hawk-moths there was absolutely no trace of Sphinx ligustri.

Today, on the 5th birthday of our daughter we went for another visit to one of the children’s playgrounds nearby. I couldn’t resist checking some of the perennial herbaceous flowering plants decorating the playground. There it was, less than 500 meters from our home, an almost full grown caterpillar was feasting.

The caterpillars of the Privet hawk-moth are amazing. This is one of the species highly suitable for raising with kids. Unfortunately, the species also suffers great losses to parasites. The caterpillar found today was carrying over a dozen eggs of parasites on its skin. The truth is this specimen will never become a moth. Something else will hatch from the chrysalis. I’ll call this finding half-success.

Nevertheless, here’s some photos of the caterpillar. I’m sure we’ll find more over the next couple weeks. This one might be a bit early anyway.

Are you afraid of…

The caterpillar. A stage every butterfly has to pass before ever being able to reveal the beauty of its wings and fly. Many people are disgusted, or even afraid of these weird looking creatures. Personally, I’m fascinated by them. And guess what, our daughter, too.

I wanted to let Sienna have a caterpillar of the Privet Hawk Moth (Sphinx ligustri) walk on her hand. I kept the camera ready. And when I was browsing through the photos I was amazed. The look she had while observing the insect, priceless.

Here’s some of the shots. Hawk Moths (Sphingidae), by the way, commonly have gigantic caterpillars with a horn at the tail. That’s why they’re sometimes referred to as hornworms. This particular caterpillar had finished eating and was preparing to pupate soon. At this stage they’re really active and won’t stop walking. A great moment to get life on photos.